4th PCNS Passive Components Networking Symposium

11 - 14th September 2023 Sønderborg Denmark

the PCNS conference was supported by the Fabrikant Mads Clausen (FMC) Foundation

first 15 students fee waived by PCNS thanks to FMC support !

organized by:

in co-operation with:

Danfoss Drive

PEDC Magazine by Elsevier

4th PCNS

The 4th edition of the PCNS Passive Components Networking Days Symposium was hosted by SDU University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg 11-14th September, 2023

About PCNS

PCNS_favicon

PCNS Passive Components Networking Symposium is a bi-annual international symposium organized by EPCI European Passive Components Institute since 2017 in co-operation with an European university.

Mission

PCNS networking symposium mission is to promote the discussion of recent developments and trends in the field of passive electronic components and to encourage the exchange of technical expertise and information covering a broad range of EEE passive components.

4th PCNS SYMPOSIUM THEME

New Passive Components Technologies for Efficient Power Conversion

Sponsors

Partners

Meet PCNS Partner:


Danfoss Drive

About Danfoss Drive


Danfoss Drives is a global leader in AC/DC and DC/DC power conversion, as well as variable speed control for electric motors. With the world’s largest portfolio of power converters, VLT® drives, and VACON® drives at your fingertips – and backing from a partner whose legacy has been built on decades of passion and experience – your journey to a better future is only just beginning.

Danfoss Drive facility tour

Danfoss Facility Tour was included in the PCNS program for all registered attendees !

Programme in Details

Program PDF
Day 1 Mo 11th Sept.: Workshop & SDU Tour
12:00 - 13:00 Registration & Welcome Coffee

13:00 - 15:50 Workshop

Workshop Part I. Passive Components Technologies for Efficient Power Conversion 

In depth discussion on new passive technologies and requirements by Thomas Ebel; SDU and Nicklas Christensen; Danfoss Drive

This workshop gives an inside into the state-of-the-art capacitor technologies in efficient power conversion applications (e.g. drives). The focus is on materials, technologies, and applications of Aluminium Electrolytic, Metallized Film and Ceramic Capacitors. Examples are discussed.

Nicklas Christensen Ph.D. received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in energy engineering, with a focus on power electronics and drives, from Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, in 2016 and 2019.

He is currently a research engineer at Danfoss Drives A/S, working with technology development. His current research interests include wide bandgap devices, power modules, digital design using finite element simulation and converter system optimization.

Prof. Thomas Ebel; SDU

  • ACADEMIC DEGREES
    1995 PhD Solid State Chemistry
    1992 Master in Chemistry
  • CURRENT POSITIONS
    2018 – Associate Professor, Head of Centre and Section, Centre for Industrial Electronics, Electrical
    Engineering, Sønderborg SDU, Denmark
  • PREVIOUS POSITIONS
    • 2008 – 2018 Managing Director and Shareholder, FTCAP GmbH, Germany (now Mersen), Manufacturer of
      Aluminium Electrolytic and Metallized Film Capacitors (180 People, 20 Mio Eu Revenue)
    • 2001 – 2008 Chief Technical Officer (Board member), Becromal SpA, Milano, Italy (now TDK foil; 180
      people 200 Mio Eu sales revenue); Foils for Aluminium Electrolytic Capacitors
    • 1995 – 2001 R&D Engineer and R&D Director , Siemens Matsushita Components, Germany (now
      EPCOS/TDK) in the field of Aluminium Electrolytic Capacitors

FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS

  • 2019 CIE is ECPE (European Centre Power Electronics )Competence Center for Capacitors
  • 2018 Finalist Peterson Innovationspreis, Automotive DC Link Capacitor
  • 1995 VCI PhD award
  • INNOVATION
    10 patents in the field of capacitors, 2 more patents pending
Coffee Break

Workshop Part II. Passive Components Technologies for Efficient Power Conversion. Case Study: 25kW SiC Power Converter Design

Speakers from onsemi and Würth Elektronik introduce design architecture of SiC based 25kW EV charger and selection of chokes & capacitors to fit it needs.

Speakers from onsemi and Würth Elektronik introduce design architecture of SiC based 25kW EV charger and selection of chokes & capacitors to fit it needs.

  • Basic block diagram for building a 25 kW DC fast charger
  • How a PFC choke works
  • PFC choke parameters
  • Advantage of flat wire choke design
  • Benefits of using a WE-AGDT auxiliary gate drive transformer
  • Circuit implementation of such a gate drive transformer
  • Characteristics of the DC link capacitors
  • Advantages of WCAP-FTDB polypropylene film DC link capacitors

Speaker 1

Both the basic block diagram for building a 25 kW DC fast charger and the architecture for building a complete system will be explained. In addition, the specifications will be explained in detail and some results will be presented. The main OnSemi components used to build the fast charger will also be presented.

Speaker 2

Power chokes with flat wire design are passive elements specially designed for use in active PFC circuits. In combination with active boost PFC circuits, these chokes achieve high efficiency and a power factor between 0.90 and 0.99. The WE-AGDT series from Würth Elektronik makes it easier than ever to implement discrete SiC gate driver designs. These off-the-shelf components are compact SMT transformers optimized for silicon carbide applications. With extremely low interwinding capacitance, the WE-AGDT helps achieve higher common mode choke transient immunity (CMTI).

DC link capacitors are placed between a DC source (battery or rectified DC) and a power stage such as an inverter or motor drive to provide a temporary buffer of energy. Würth Elektronik eiSos introduces the new DC-Link film capacitors to provide solutions for the high energy density applications of the future in e-mobility and renewable technologies. The WCAP-FTDB capacitors offer high ruggedness and stability over a long load life thanks to the metallized polypropylene film (MKP).

Didier Balocco 

He received is engineering degree from in the "École Nationale Supérieure d’Électronique et de RadioÉlectricité de Bordeaux", France in 1992 and his Ph. D. degree in Power Electronics from the University of Bordeaux in 1997. In 1996, he joined AEG Power Solutions, formerly Alcatel Converters, as a research engineer for DC-DC and AC-DC converters design in a range of 1 W to 1 kW mainly for telecom equipments. He managed the research activities from 2000 to 2014. He published more than 10 papers on power electronics. He holds 1 patent. From 2011 to 2013, he worked 18 months on a 15-kW solar inverter (DC-AC) module for a 150-kW cabinet in Dallas, Texas, USA. His main interests during this period were switching mode power supplies, converter stability and modeling as well as high power factor rectifiers. He joined Fairchild Semiconductor in August 2014 as a Field Application Engineer (FAE) supporting south of France, Spain and Portugal. In 2016, onsemi acquired Fairchild. In 2018, he moved to a new role inside onsemi. He is currently a Business Marketing Engineer for Europe focusing on power devices and Silicon Carbide.

Didier Balocco received is engineering degree from in the "École Nationale Supérieure d’Électronique et de RadioÉlectricité de Bordeaux", France in 1992 and his Ph. D. degree in Power Electronics from the University of Bordeaux in 1997. In 1996, he joined AEG Power Solutions, formerly Alcatel Converters, as a research engineer for DC-DC and AC-DC converters design in a range of 1 W to 1 kW mainly for telecom equipments. He managed the research activities from 2000 to 2014. He published more than 10 papers on power electronics. He holds 1 patent. From 2011 to 2013, he worked 18 months on a 15-kW solar inverter (DC-AC) module for a 150-kW cabinet in Dallas, Texas, USA. His main interests during this period were switching mode power supplies, converter stability and modeling as well as high power factor rectifiers.

He joined Fairchild Semiconductor in August 2014 as a Field Application Engineer (FAE) supporting south of France, Spain and Portugal. In 2016, onsemi acquired Fairchild. In 2018, he moved to a new role inside onsemi. He is currently a Business Marketing Engineer for Europe focusing on power devices and Silicon Carbide.

Frank Puhane studied electrical engineering with a focus on communications engineering at the semiconductor company Atmel Germany in Heilbronn. He then spent three years as a development engineer for customer-specific controls at the medium-sized company Jung Electronic in Kirchhausen. Since 2013, he has been working for Würth Elektronik eiSos, initially for three years as a field application engineer. After this, he moved to the area of capacitors and resistors, where he headed the Technical Engineering department for several years. Since 2022, he is Head of Product Management for Capacitors & Resistors.

Coffee Break

16:00 - 18:00 SDU Tour

Tour through  SDU University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg

Come and join us to meet SDU university, its staff and capabilities.

SDU Sønderborg is located in scenic and historic surroundings with views to both Alssund and Sønderborg Castle. The university's more than 1,000 students are just a short walk from the city centre, water, beach and forest. SDU Sønderborg is part of the impressive and state-of-the-art building Alsion which, besides the university, houses Videnspark Alsion, Business Academy Southwest, a concert hall and the South Denmark Philharmonic, providing outstanding opportunities for expanding cooperation between universities, business and culture.

Day 2 Tue 12th Sept.: Welcome, Keynotes, Sessions & Welcome Drink
8:00 - 9:00 Registration & Welcome Coffee

9:00 - 11:50 Welcome & Keynote

Chairman: Tomas Zednicek, EPCI

Welcome Speech

Welcome from EPCI European Passive Components Institute and SDU University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg

Tomas Zednicek Ph.D.; EPCI
EPCI President and Owner

Prof. Thomas Ebel; SDU
Associate Professor, Head of Centre and Section, Centre for Industrial Electronics, Electrical
Engineering, Sønderborg SDU, Denmark

Keynote I. Passive Components Market & Trends in Europe; presented by Thomas Ebel, EPCIA board member

Market Trend Passive Components 2019 to 2022

Passive components are the “unseen” electrical components but essential for all electronic circuits. This talk show you the European market development trend in dependence of the type of the component and the application of the recent years.

Mission

To represent and promote the common interests of the Passive Components Manufacturers active in Europe to ensure an open and transparent market for Passive Components in Europe as part of the global market place.

Passive Components are an independent and thriving industry

Passive component manufacturers play a key role in the development of the electronics industry and more globally in the development of the e-society in Europe and the rest of the world. Every new function, every new semiconductor, generates new requirements in volume and performance for passive components. Supported by several large companies, a great number of SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises), national associations and technological research institutes, the passive component industry has accumulated a considerable competence and know-how over the years. Electronic systems and equipment, as well as electronic components, are undergoing crucial changes. Increasing performance and miniaturisation are becoming standard requirements. European industry has been able to face up to these challenges successfully.

Speakers Introduction

In this section speakers from all three days will be briefly introduced.

Attendees are encouraged to network speakers and other attendees during breaks and social events.

Coffee Break

TPI Technical Product Introduction

5 min flash presentations to introduce new product / hot items / services. 

TPI is very suitable to combine with Sponsors & Exhibition Booth to introduce key products / company and invite attendees to meet at the booth

Lunch Break

12:40 - 14:10 Session I. Technology & Roadmaps

Chairman: Luca Primavesi, Itelcond

1.1. Improving High Voltage Power Modules with new Silicon Snubber Capacitor technology

Speaker: Tom Choicy; MURATA

Murata’s new Silicon Snubber Capacitor technology offers solutions for high voltage power modules, enabling them to fully harness the benefits of wide band gap technologies by overcoming the issues they may face.

This component not only improves efficiency but also offers easy assembly within the module using the same methods as power transistors. With our technology, power modules can achieve unprecedented performance and reliability, making them ideal for the demanding requirements of the automotive high voltage market.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS
  • RESISTORS

Topics:

  • TECHNOLOGY & ROADMAPS
  • NEW DEVELOPMENT

Tom Choicy is with MURATA

- Master's degree in innovation marketing at a French business school, during which I did a two-year work-study placement at Murata as an innovation marketing assistant.

- In July 2022, after obtaining my Master's degree, I took up the position of junior product manager for automotive high-voltage applications.

1.2. Main failure modes on connectors – Feedback from Failure Analyses on connectors - all electronic sectors

Speaker: Cédric Favarel; SERMA TECHNOLOGIES

SERMA TECHNOLOGIES will present failure statistics of connectors from field return analyzed during the last 10 years.
- Presentations of the main defects encountered during failure analysis
- Description of the associated mechanisms and root causes (if identified)

An oral technical presentation will address the following points:
- Brief history of Serma Labs, equipment used for FA and statistics of types of failure
- Focus and description on the followings failures modes, causing failure as Open Circuit / Short Circuit/High contact resistance or Intermittent defect
- Package/insulation issue
- Crimping
- Press fit or soldering Issue
- Pollution
- Metallic Migration
- Fretting corrosion
- Wear out
- The origin of defect (component manufacturing issue, board assembly process, or environment) will also be discussed.
- How the use of partial discharge can allow to locate an insulation weakness issues on connectors comparatively to classical dielectric stress test.

Components:

  • CONNECTORS & CABLES

Topics:

  • TECHNOLOGY & ROADMAPS
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY
  • DEVELOPMENT

Cédric Favarel

Failure analysis engineer in the Passive Components Competence Center team at SERMA TECHNOLOGIES laboratory.

Graduate engineer in 2010 from the Polytechnic School of the University of Nantes (France), specializing in materials research and development.

Eric Zaia  is with SERMA TECHNOLOGIES

1.3. 3V EDLC products for a longer useful life

Speaker: Gerald Tatschl; Vishay BCcomponents Austria GmbH

Few manufacturers have developed and launched 3.0V EDLC products in addition to 2.7V! In order to achieve a longer useful life in applications, there are innovative products that also meet the stronger and more harsh requirements with regard to high humidity and low losses over a wide temperature range. Electrical Double Layer Capacitors (EDLC) have shown significant growth in the last several years.

EDLC products with 3V also store 20% more energy than a 2.7V system with the same size. In addition, 3V components helps electronic development engineers to get a longer useful life, as the voltage window is larger and will save space and costs on a PCB circuit. Today's 3V Vishay products are 1:1 interchangeable with existing 2.7V types, and allow two to three times longer service life.

The advantage of "ruggedized" EDLC variants is that these products can withstand more severe environmental conditions than standard versions.

Tests have shown that these "ruggedized" variants achieve service lives of 1,500 hours and more even at 85°C/85%RH (source: Vishay, 235 EDLC-HVR). The IEC standard requires only 1,000 hours for these components. After this forum engineers will have a better understanding of the EDLC technology to design more efficient and cost-effective power - backup applications using EDLC products.

Components:

  •    CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •    TECHNOLOGY & ROADMAPS

Gerald Tatschl

Sr. Manager Product Marketing Auminum and EDLC Vishay BCcomponents Austria GmbH

Gerald Tatschl joined Vishay BCcomponents Austria GmbH in year 2000.

Gerald is working in the Aluminum Division at Vishay and is responsible for Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors and Electrical Double Layer Capacitor in the position as a Sr. Manager Product Marketing.

Background: Experience in

  • More than 30 years of work experience in the electronics industry
  • Background in Electronics
  • In charge of technical engineering, product services, and application support for aluminum and EDLC capacitors at Vishay BCcomponents Austria GmbH

Gerald Tatschl studied electrical engineering with a focus on communications engineering in Austria.

1.4. Quality Assessment and Lifetime Prediction of Base Metal Electrode Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors: Challenges and Opportunities

Speaker: Pedram Yousefian; PhD Candidate, Center for Dielectrics and Piezoelectrics, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, USA

Base metal electrode (BME) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) are widely used in aerospace, medical, military, and communication applications, emphasizing the need for high reliability. The ongoing advancements in BaTiO3-based MLCC technology have facilitated further miniaturization and improved capacitive volumetric density for both low and high voltage devices. However, concerns persist regarding infant mortality failures and long-term reliability under higher fields and temperatures. To address these concerns, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying insulation resistance degradation is crucial. Furthermore, there is a need to develop effective screening procedures during MLCC production and improve the accuracy of mean time to failure (MTTF) predictions.

This article reviewing our findings on the effect of the burn-in test, a common quality control process, on the dynamics of oxygen vacancies within BME MLCCs. These findings reveal the burn-in test has a negative impact on the lifetime and reliability of BME MLCCS. Moreover, we discuss the limitations of existing lifetime prediction models for BME MLCCs and  highlight the need for improved MTTF predictions by employing physics-based machine learning model to overcome the existinging models limitations. We also discuss the new physical-based machine learning model that has been developed. While data limitations remain a challenge, the physics-based machine learning approach offers promising results for MTTF prediction in MLCCs, contributing to improved lifetime predictions. Furthermore, the article acknowledges the limitations of relying solely on MTTF to predict MLCCs’ lifetime and emphasizes the importance of developing comprehensive prediction models that predict the entire distribution of failures.

Components:

  •    CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •    TECHNOLOGY & ROADMAPS

Pedram Yousefian and Prof. Clive A. Randall (advisor)

Pedram Yousefian is PhD Candidate, Center for Dielectrics and Piezoelectrics, Materials Research Institute

The Pennsylvania State University, USA

Coffee Break

15:00 - 17:00 Session II. Materials & Processes

Chairman: William Greenbank, SDU

2.1. Responsible and Stable Tantalum Supply

Speaker: Gordon Smith; GAM Global Advanced Metals

Of the many lessons learned by the electronics industry from the COVID years, a stable and reliable supply chain ranks at or near the top. For tantalum, a responsible, steady, and ethical supply chain is a necessity in the production of electronic components such as capacitors and semiconductors for use in automotive, aerospace, medical, consumer electronics, defense, energy, and chemical processing industries. What have the historical ups and downs taught the tantalum supply chain? How is the supply chain evolving and positioning for long-term growth driven by data storage, communications infrastructure, artificial intelligence, electric and self-drive vehicles?

The 2020’s and post-COVID years have ushered in a new era of the tantalum supply chain: tantalum ore is readily available from regulatory-compliant and trusted sources, conversion is geographically diverse and in stable locations and OEM demand is growing across many industries globally.

The paper and presentation will discuss tantalum supply chain past, present and future considerations and how it can now be viewed as sustainable and reliable in support of all relevant industries.

Components:

  •    CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES

Dr. Gordon Smith

Gordon Smith holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University, a Master of Science degree and a Doctorate of Science degree in Chemical Engineering both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Finance from the University of Chicago.  He has led the R&D organization at GAM since 2019, leveraging over 25 years of experience in developing electronic materials and business leadership in semiconductors, chip packaging, high-density circuits, printed wiring boards, buried passives, and printed electronics. 

Kurt Habecker is with GAM Global Advanced Metals

2.2. Extending the capacity and high voltage performance of Ta-capacitors

Speaker: Melanie Stenzel; TANIOBIS GmbH

Applications in automotive, medical and aerospace require higher voltages than consumer electronics but also high energy density and excellent reliability. During the past year efforts have been made to provide a new class of tantalum powders with a unique combination of structural homogeneity, high purity and tailored pore structure. Anodes made from this powder provide higher capacitances than any other tantalum powder, while achieving high reliability for anodization voltages from 75 V to 350 V.

Best-in-class capacitors can only be made from best-in-class anodes, so the development does not stop at the powder development. We would like to share improved pressing techniques with the introduction of a next generation automatic press. This new press enables the manufacture of anodes without binder- resulting in quicker processing time and less handling associated with de-lubrication steps. The innovative compression mechanisms also significantly reduced anode-die friction in both lab and industrial production volumes. The resultant anodes can provide improved high voltage performance from the elimination of binder related carbon content, and reduced metallic impurities associated with surface burnishing. Combined with TANIOBIS powders and an optimized anodization, one can produce high voltage anodes with low DCL, the highest energy density and outstanding reliability.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Dr. Melanie Stenzel

PhD in Chemistry, Director of Marketing at TANIOBIS GmbH (former H.C. Starck Tantalum and Niobium GmbH). After developing Niobium capacitors and Ta-polymer process at EPCOS, she started 2006 at H.C. Starck, now TANIOBIS,  as application engineer for capacitor powder. In 2008 she took over the responsibility for the Strategic Marketing and New Business Development for Tantalum & Niobium Products and extended the portfolio to further markets. Drives Additive Manufacturing activities for Tantalum and Niobium powder with expert knowledge.

Marcel Hagymási is with TANIOBIS GmbH

Harald Haberer is with hd mechanic GmbH

2.3. Voltage Dependence of Ferroelectric Class 2 Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors

Speaker: Frank Puhane; Würth Elektronik eiSos GmbH

We revise the physical background of the voltage-dependent capacitance of class 2 Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors (MLCC) and present models for this voltage-depend capacitance. Two processes can be distinguished, leading to an immediate as well as a long-term dc-capacitance dependence.

Both processes are related to the ferroelectric properties of class 2 materials. The immediate process is related to the dipole reorientation within the material domain structure. The origin of the long-time DC effect, still discussed in the scientific community, is likely to be related to domain-wall movement. We will also discuss the influence of the two processes on the application of MLCCs.

Components:

  •  CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
  • APPLICATIONS
  • MODELLING & SIMULATION

Frank Puhane

  • Head of Product Management
    eiCap / eiRis - Capacitors and Resistors
  • +497942 9454033
  • puhane@we-onlin.de
  • Würth Elektronik eiSos, Max-Eyth-Str. 1, 74638 Waldenburg

Background:

  • Experience in
    • More than 15 years of work experience in the electronics industry
    • Background in Electronics, Power Supply Development
    • Formerly worked as Field Application Engineer
    • In charge of technical engineering, product services, and application support for capacitors and resistors at Würth Elektronik

Frank Puhane studied electrical engineering with a focus on communications engineering at the semiconductor company Atmel Germany in Heilbronn. He then spent three years as a development engineer for customer-specific controls at the medium-sized company Jung Electronic in Kirchhausen. Since 2013, he has been working for Würth Elektronik eiSos, initially for three years as a field application engineer. After this, he moved to the area of capacitors and resistors, where he headed the Technical Engineering department for several years. Since 2022, he is Head of Product Management for Capacitors & Resistors.

René Kalbitz Ph.D.

    • Product Manager, Supercapacitors
      eiCap / eiRis - Capacitors and Resistors
    • +4930 5480 702 114
    • kalbitz@we-online.com
    • Würth Elektronik eiSos, Competence Center Berlin, Volmerstraße 10, 12489 Berlin

Background:

  • Experience in
    • application-oriented research
    • development of organic electronics,
    • polymer analysis
    • responsible for Supercapacitors
    • capacitor technologies

Dr. René Kalbitz studied physics at the University of Potsdam and at the University of Southampton (GB). After completing his diploma degree, he gained his Ph.D. in the field of organic semiconductors and insulators at the University of Potsdam. He was able to gain further experience in the field of applied research at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research. He has been employed at Würth Elektronik as a product manager for Supercapacitors since 2018 and oversees research and development projects in the field of capacitors.

2.4. Thick Film on Steel Resistor Technology - Increasingly Power Dense & Demanding Applications

Speaker: Chris Muter ; TT Electronics

We revise the physical background of the voltage-dependent capacitance of class 2 Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors (MLCC) and present models for this voltage-depend capacitance. Two processes can be distinguished, leading to an immediate as well as a long-term dc-capacitance dependence.

Both processes are related to the ferroelectric properties of class 2 materials. The immediate process is related to the dipole reorientation within the material domain structure. The origin of the long-time DC effect, still discussed in the scientific community, is likely to be related to domain-wall movement. We will also discuss the influence of the two processes on the application of MLCCs.

Components:

  •  CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
  • APPLICATIONS
  • MODELLING & SIMULATION

Chris Muter 

Chris Muter completed an engineering apprenticeship, continued to study part time in Mechanical Engineering, graduating from Teesside university in 2016. Chris’ career started out as a CNC machinist, transitioning to process engineering and then Design/Development. Then moving to the electronics industry and specialised in resistor design and project management. Significant experience in setting up new manufacturing facilities. Lead design engineer for thick on steel products at TT Electronics

Coffee Break

17:20 - 19:20 Session II. (cont.) Materials & Processes

Chairman: William Greenbank, SDU

2.5. Assembly technology of electronic components for e-textiles

Speaker: Tomas Blecha; University of West Bohemia

Nowadays, three basic options exist for assembling and contacting SMD components on PCBs. Standard technology such as soldering is not compatible with some flexible substrates for electronics and e-textiles. The reason is the high thermal load of not very heat-resistant substrates (PET film, paper, textiles, etc.) during the soldering process. Technology using electrically conductive adhesives do not reach the strength of soldered joints but allows a substantial reduction in thermal load. However, with a reduced curing temperature, the curing time increases significantly, up to several hours. These technologies are therefore completely unsuitable for fast and safe contacting of components on some flexible substrates.

An alternative to the mentioned methods can be non-conductive adhesives, for which very low or even no thermal curing (UV curable polymers) and comparable electrical and mechanical properties of joints with electrically conductive adhesives are sufficient. This contacting technology, as shown by the realized experiments, is particularly suitable for the currently developing field of e-textiles.
Creating an electrical join between an electronic component and conducted pattern based on non-conductive UV curable polymers has several fundamental advantages: (i) Almost no heat stress of the substrate, (ii) Curing of the joint in a matter of seconds, (iii) Properties of the connection better or comparable to the connections made with conductive adhesives, (iv) Contacting also creates protection of the component from the external environment (encapsulation), (v) Available UV curable adhesives on the market, (vi) Easy implementation of the technology in industrial production.


The article will present the principle of contacting electronic components directly to conductive motive realized using conductive hybrid threads on textile substrates. The results of testing the effect of mechanical stress, chemical cleaning, and climatic changes on the contact resistance between the electronic component and the contact surface on the textile substrate will be presented.

Components:

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • MEASUREMENT & TEST
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY
  • NEW DEVELOPMENT

Tomas Blecha, Martin Hirman, Jiri Navratil are with University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic

Tomas Blecha received master degree in Electronic and Telecommunications at the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen in 2003 and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering on the same university in 2007 and assoc. prof. in 2016 also at the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen. His main research interests are in the areas of design and characterization of microwave printed circuit boards and devices. In addition he is performing research in e-textiles, printed electronics, measurement, modelling and simulation for high frequency transmission lines and circuits.

2.6. Unleashing the Power: Superior Properties of Fluorographene-Derived Materials for Energy Storage Applications

Speaker: Michal Otyepka; CATRIN, Palacký University Olomouc

Graphene, its composites, and derivatives have been identified as promising materials for energy storage applications, especially in supercapacitor and battery electrode materials. However, the direct preparation of graphene derivatives from graphene is hindered by the high inertness of graphene. One possible solution to this challenge is the utilization of the fluorographene chemistry, which can be carried out under mild and controllable conditions [1]. Furthermore, the chemistry of fluorographene benefits from an easily available pristine material, graphite fluoride, on the market. Various graphene derivatives have been prepared using fluorographene chemistry. These derivatives have shown promising properties as electrode materials for supercapacitors and batteries.


One of these derivatives is graphene acid (available at graphene-derivatives.com), which is produced through a two-step synthesis and bears ~12% of covalently grafted carboxyl groups on both sides [2]. Graphene acid is a conductive (~25 S/m) and perfectly water-dispersible material, making it an excellent candidate for supercapacitor electrodes. Graphene acid has demonstrated a capacitance of ~100 F/g and high specific capacitance retention (>95%) after 60,000 C/D cycles at a current density of 3 A/g in a two-electrode cell system [3,4]. The performance of graphene acid can be further improved by hybridizing it with a metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. A resulting hybrid material acts as an effective charge storing material with a capacitance of up to 650 F/g [5].

Another interesting class of supercapacitor electrode materials is nitrogen-doped graphene, which is obtained through the reduction of fluorographene by nitrogen-containing compounds [6]. Another nitrogen-doped graphene with a high level of nitrogen doping, diamond-like bonds and an ultra-high mass density of 2.8 g/mL exhibits high volumetric energy (up to 200 Wh/L) and power density (up to 52 kW/L) [7]. Commercialization of this material (SC-GN3) is currently supported by EIC Transtion project (trans2Dchem.com).

Finally, the chemistry of fluorographene can also be used to conjugate graphene with polysulfide chains, leading to highly sulfur-doped graphene. This material exhibits very high full-cathode-mass capacity and rate capability, combined with superior cycling stability, making it an efficient cathode material for LiS batteries with a low shuttling effect [7].

Components:

  • Capacitors

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES

Michal Otyepka 

Prof. Michal Otyepka has a degree in physical chemistry. He is developing the chemistry of fluorographene towards new functional graphene derivatives under the support of ERC grant 2DCHEM. He was the Head of the Department of Physical Chemistry at Palacký University (2008–2019). Currently, he is the Head of CATRIN-RCPTM at Palacký University. He (co)authored 270 scientific papers, cited more than 15.000 times (H-index 62, by Scopus), and 2 patent applications. Since 2014, he has been coordinating the collaboration with TEVA Czech Industries, s.r.o., in the field of surface properties of API compounds. He was involved in collaboration with many national and international companies including, P&G in the field of permeation of compounds though skin membrane models, NenoVision, s.r.o., in the field of correlative microscopies, etc. Since 2020, he has been a member of the Scientific Board of the Czech Grant Agency.

Vítězslav Hrubý, Veronika Šedajová, Petr Jakubec, Aristeidis Bakandritsos, Radek Zbořil are with CATRIN Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic

2.7. Evaluation of key parameters for supercapacitors based on activated carbons derived from the plastic waste

Speaker: Ivan Dědek; CATRIN, UPOL University, Czech Republic

Activated carbon (AC) serve as an excellent candidate for the building of supercapacitors exploiting the electric double-layer capacitance mechanism. As a reaction to a global requirement to reuse plastic waste and the demand for long-lasting sustainable electronics, we managed to transform polymers into highly porous AC material suitable for supercapacitor electrodes.


The effective conversion of plastic waste into AC electrodes is impeded by a limited understanding of the crucial parameters that control the supercapacitive properties. Aside from the well-known micropore volume and size, our investigation has brought to light other significant parameters that were previously unexplored.

We found that critical factors such as polymer glass transition temperature, polymer-activating agent miscibility, activating agent:AC ratio, and AC water dispersion stability play a crucial role in determining the supercapacitor's performance. Managing these parameters, we obtained AC with a competitive electrochemical performance as supercapacitor electrodes fabricated from a range of plastic waste materials. Specifically, the ACs exhibited a specific capacitance of 220 F g−1 (at a current density of 1 A g−1), energy and power densities of 61.1 Wh kg−1 and 36.9 kW kg−1, respectively, and excellent cycling stability (95% retention after 30,000 cycles). Our findings provide a pathway towards transforming plastic waste into valuable electrode materials.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES

Ivan Dědek

Ivan Dědek is pursuing his Ph.D. at the Palacky University and is simultaneously employed as a researcher at Czech Advanced Technology and Research Institute (CATRIN) under the supervision of Prof. Michal Otyepka. In 2020, he completed his MSc in Material Chemistry at Palacky University. His research is focused on energy storage utilizing conductive polymers and metal-organic frameworks.  In 2022, electrochemistry expertise was expanded by studying materials biosensing abilities.

Vojtěch Kupka, Petr Jakubec are with CATRIN, UPOL University, Czech Republic

2.8. Smart textile speaker

Speaker: Julie Hladikova; University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic

Smart textiles or e-textiles are evolving part of electronics and bring new approaches and views for the electronics device itself. The materials and technologies such as conductive threads, ribbons, new contacting technologies and interconnecting with conventional electronics are crucial part of the development of new functional smart textiles garments. This abstract is focused on the development and testing of textile electroacoustic transducer (speaker).

A hybrid conductive thread is used for embroidering of the coil and small magnet is placed under it. When audio signal is played in the embroidered coil, interaction of the magnetic fields creates forces between magnet and coil and the textile itself works as a membrane of the speaker. The coil shape and size is optimized and the final pattern is embroidered to real textile products – a pillow and an elastic sport headband. The frequency characteristic of the tested patterns and of the textile products will be presented in the full paper. The application of the speaker can reach from well-being or sports to healthcare sphere.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • MEASUREMENT & TEST
  • APPLICATIONS
  • NEW DEVELOPMENT

Julie Hladikova

Julie Hladikova is a 19-year-old student at Blovice Gymnasium. In 2021, she participated in the Science FEL Academy event organized by Faculty of Electrical Engineering, where she first encountered the topic of smart textiles. She became interested in this topic and started exploring the possibilities of creating a textile speaker in more detail. The results of her initial experiments were published at the international conference ISSE 2022 in Vienna. The textile speaker was also the subject of her graduation thesis, and after successfully passing her graduation exams this year, she will begin her first year at Faculty of Electrical Engineering next week.

Jiri Navratil

Jiri Navratil is a researcher at the Department of Materials and Technology at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen. His primary research interests lied in the field of printed flexible electronics. However, he has recently shifted his focus towards e-textiles projects, where his main responsibility is developing new methods of connecting conventional electronics to e-textiles. In addition to his research work, Jiri is an active science popularizer. He actively engages with high school students, mentoring them on their projects and conducting science and technology workshops and presentations.

Stanislav Bouzek is with University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic

19:30 Welcome Drink at SDU
Day 3 Wed 13th Sept.: Hot Panel, Sessions, Danfoss Drive Tour & Gala Dinner
8:30 - 9:00 Registration & Welcome Coffee

9:00 - 10:30 Keynote & HOT Topic Panel

Chairman & Facilitator: Tomas Zednicek, EPCI

Keynote II. Advanced SiC Power Modules and Stacks for E-Mobility

Speaker: Fabio Carastro Semikron Danfoss

Advanced SiC Power Modules and Stacks for E-Mobility

Next generation SiC-MOSFET power modules for electric vehicle applications are targeting increased power density and efficiency to reduce the overall drivetrain and charger cost. High currents, fast switching transients as well as high power density packages demand: best use of semiconductor area by advanced bonding, cooling technologies and layout optimization.

This presentation will give an overview of state-of-the-art of Semikron Danfoss power modules packaging, latest development in current sensing integration and some examples of high power density converter design with focus on SiC-MOSFET for E-Mobility applications.

Dr. Fabio Carastro
Semikron Danfoss

Fabio Carastro is a Senior power Electronics Engineer with 20+ years of practical experience in Business-Driven R&D. He received his M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2003 and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering
from the University of Nottingham, UK in 2007.

From 2007 to 2010 he was a Research Fellow at Nottingham University. He joined General Electric R&D High Power Electronic Department Germany in in 2010 then Semikron-Danfoss in 2018.

He is currently responsible for the Power Electronics Hardware at the System Development Centre in Munich (Germany), creating customized power electronics solutions for the e-mobility and industrial applications. His research interests are high power Si and SiC devices for Automotive and Industrial applications, Power Modules design and system level optimization, MW scale converter design, topologies, power quality and reliability.

HOT PANEL DISCUSSION

Power Conversion Challenges and Consequences to Passive Components

  • Key Discussion Items
    • Wide gap semiconductors
      • trends and its consequence to passive components (selection guide, technology / advancements needed)
      • EV inverter trends – fast growth or traps 
    • Low volt power conversion – energy harvesting challenges
    • RoHS and Sustainability challenges – influence to the component selection guide ?  
    • High Power Density Trends 
      • How to achieve high level of integration within power module
      • Inter-connection challenges and integrated passives
  • Challenges and Questions to Panellists

Invited Panelists:

Semiconductor Industry:

Dr. Fabio Carastro Semikron Danfoss

Passive Components:

Ruediger Scheel; Murata Vice President Mobility

Academia:

Prof. Thomas Ebel; SDU

Coffee Break

10:50 - 11:50 Session III. Quality & Reliability

Chairman: Joaquín Jiménez, ESA ESTEC

3.1. Climatic reliability of electronic parts - solution of the challenge

Speaker: Vladimir Sítko; PBT Works s.r.o., Roznov p.Radhostem, Czech Republic

Climatic reliability of electronic parts – solution of the challenge
Reliability is the primary concern of electronic assemblies in many applications today. Demands for a long lifetime and the ability to work in a harsh environment have become essential for electronic equipment.

One primary risk for all electronic assemblies is electrochemical migration (ECM). Conditions that trigger the ion movement are bias, ionic active impurities, and moisture. Depending on the intensity of those three factors, the damage starts slowly or faster. Because of hardly predictable environmental moisture conditions, it is not easy to predict when the ECM can start.
The paper compares two ways to increase the robustness of assembly against ECM.
The often applied is the protection of assemblies by separating the ionic residues (generated during assembly) against moisture. We describe present methods of industrial application of so-called NO-clean technology. We show current testing methods and calculations of the risk of ECM for such an approach.

The other method for increasing the robustness is cleaning. By cleaning electronic assemblies, we understand a thorough cleaning. The most critical parts of the assembly are the areas between poles. For most packages, this means perfectly cleaning the space (gap) under the component.
The challenge of cleaning the gap under the component causes a significant difference between the cleaning process, which was sufficient 15-20 years ago, and which needs to be strictly controlled now.

In the paper, we underline some challenges in gap cleaning. We describe state-of-the-art methods of cleaning process control and diagnostics, which move the cleaning process from randomly controlled to very safe with stable results

Components:

  •  All

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY

Vladimir Sítko

Vladimír Sítko is a founder and managing director of PBT Works s.r.o, a recognized manufacturer of cleaning systems for electronic assemblies, stencil, and microelectronic applications. He was starting his career in the microelectronics industry as a developer of the mechanical and physical measuring instrument and production machines for prototyping for chip process, assembly, and encapsulation. Later he was engaged as a process project engineer for vacuum electronic component production.In 90-ties, he founded an SMT process machines and materials supply and consulting service company PBT Roznov. He gained deep expertise in the soldering process, paste printing process, and PCBA cleaning. At the same time, he was starting the business with development, design, and manufacturing machines for PCBA and maintenance cleaning, which is now running under PBT Works s.r.o. He is participating in several research tasks for cleaning technology. He sets concepts of PBT cleaning machines and process optimization methods. He is also working on the development of new measuring instruments for cleaning parameters monitoring and performance enhancements. He is an owner or co-owner of several patents.

3.2. Selecting MLCC's That Meet High Reliability Requirements of Medical Implantable Devices

Speaker: Samuel Dowrick; Knowles Precision Devices

Designing medical implantable devices for high reliability is crucial for a variety of reasons. Since patient safety is paramount, any precautions to reduce the possibility of potentially life-threatening malfunctions, recalls, and replacement surgeries are necessary. And, beyond preventing patient safety issues, there may also be severe economic and legal implications for device manufacturers if an implantable device fails. To ensure that these components are manufactured to meet medical implantable application standards, proper screening and high reliability design is required. Both aspects are critical when choosing components implemented into the human body.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY
  • APPLICATIONS

Victor Lu

is applications engineer at Knowles Precision Devices, California, USA. He received bachelor’s degree by University of Riverside in California in 2013. Since 2015 he has been on various application engineering positions in the industry of electronic protection and passive electronic components.

Samuel Dowrick 

I am an R&D / applications engineer for Knowles Precision Devices. My field of expertise is high power electronics including RF as well as EMI filtering including high rel applications. I also specialise in safety caps. I have a degree in manufacturing engineering and am currently undertaking a degree in electrical and electronic engineering at the University of Derby. Prior to working for Knowles I worked as an R&D engineer for a company that manufactured excavator attachments, this involved electronic and hydraulic system design. I also have experience In structural steel design for companies such as Thames Water.

Lunch Break

12:40 - 14:40 Session III. (cont.) Quality & Reliability

Chairman: Joaquín Jiménez, ESA ESTEC

3.3. De-risking plan at Cryogenic Temperatures for PETERCEM microswitch

Speaker: Manuel Sánchez; Alter Technology

The challenge of Space business increases from one year to another due to the increasing complexity of the mission objectives and the instruments involved. As a result of this, high stringent environmental requirements are arising more often.

Following this trend, ESA’s ARIEL (Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey, ESA Cosmic Vision M4) science mission includes a Cold Payload Module (PLM), which comprises some instruments working at extreme low temperatures around 40K. M2 Mechanism (M2M), a positioning mechanism manufactured by SENER, is one of these instruments. It allows an accurate motion/adjustment of the secondary mirror of the ARIEL telescope in order to compensate the optical alignment of the telescope. The subsystem includes the pointing mechanism (M2M) and the telescope control unit (TCU) joined by the harness.


In particular, it is of interest the case of the M2M Harness operating at different temperature ranges (cryogenic, ambient and a transition temperature from cryogenic to ambient), where a microswitch manufactured by PETERCEM (FR) has been selected to know the status of the mechanism at cryogenic temperature values.

This part, previously ESCC QPL in the past, has been introduced as an alternative to Honeywell microswitch for Space, which currently has a long lead time (more than 40 weeks). On the other hand, it is still to be proven that the part manufactured by PETERCEM is able to withstand cryogenic temperatures.

For this reason, a de-risking plan, consisting of a functional verification at 40K, has been proposed by ALTER with review and agreement of SENER and ESA in order to test some samples and get some de-risking results that should give some confidence before submitting this part to a proper qualification according to the missions’ requirements. The di-risking test results should confirm that the Petercem microswitch is a valuable alternative to Honeywell microswitch.

Components:

  •  INTERCONNECT - MICROSWITCHES

Topics:

  • MEASUREMENT & TEST
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY

Manuel Sánchez

Graduated in Industrial Engineering, specializing in electrical engineering at Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Seville, Spain. MSc in Renewable Energy Engineering at Kingston University London. He has 7 years of experience in EEE parts product assurance & procurement for space market at Alter Technology TÜV NORD. Currently he is technical advisor for co-ordinated parts selection agency on mission’s early phases, technical support to new space customers, constellations and non-EU customers. He works as parts engineer for co-ordinated parts procurement agency for EUCLID, PLATO & ARIEL missions. Member of ESA CTB Passive Working Group.

Juan Barbero is with Alter Technology

Léo Farhat with ESA ESTEC

3.4. Ceramic capacitors: recent in-orbit failure and proposed way forward

Speaker: Adrià Escoda; Joaquín Jiménez; ESA ESTEC

Rework or direct wiring soldering processes can originate cracks in capacitors due to excessive thermal shock. During the lifespan of the component in demanding environments, such as in space, the crack originated during soldering can propagate and cause catastrophic failures.

This paper shows some of the most recent examples of capacitor failures that ESA has detected. In addition, tantalum capacitors and flexible ceramic capacitors are being procured in order to submit them to a thorough test flow.

The aim is to gather test data which might end up supporting or disauthorising these rework processes for space applications. The findings of this research are foreseen to be the basis for an eventual update of the Standard ECSS-Q-ST-70-61C with such authorisation or prohibition. 

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY
  • APPLICATIONS

Joaquin Jimenez

Joaquin Jimenez got a Master Degree in Telecommunications Engineering at the University of Seville (Spain). He started his career as EEE components test engineer at the Parts Laboratory department at ALTER TECHNOLOGY (Seville, Spain). He moved then to the ESA Materials and Electrical Components Laboratory at ESTEC (Noordwijk, The Netherlands), where he worked as EEE test engineer as well. In November 2020 he joined ESA's Component Section as EEE component engineer, specializing in passive and RF passive components, working as a team with Dr. Léo A. Farhat.

Adrià Escoda

Adrià Escoda holds a BSc and MSc in Industrial Technology Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Spain). He also obtained a MSc in Materials Science and Engineering from Luleå University of Technology (Sweden). He started his professional career in the space sector at SENER Aeroespacial (Barcelona, Spain). In October 2022 he joined ESA ESTEC (Noordwijk, The Netherlands) as a Young Graduate Trainee in the Components Section. He is currently working with passive components under the mentorship of Dr. Léo Farhat and Mr. Joaquín Jiménez. 

3.5. Reliability and Failure Mode in Solid Tantalum Capacitors

Speaker: Yuri Freeman; KEMET YAGEO

Capacitor derating, decreasing application voltage in comparison to rated voltage, is now broadly discussed in aerospace and other mission critical applications with regard to usage of the commercial type capacitors (typically automotives) in these applications.

Derating reduces electrical stress on the dielectric and thus reduces failure rate and improves reliability of the capacitor. At the same time, derating approach in Tantalum capacitors results in sharp loss of the volumetric efficiency (key advantage of Tantalum capacitors vs. other major types of the capacitors) and in some cases causes reliability loss vs. low/no derating capacitors with the same capacitance and voltage.

This presentation discusses key mechanisms and technological factors affecting the derating effects on reliability and efficiency of Tantalum capacitors. Advanced technologies that allow high reliability applications of Tantalum capacitors with low/no derating and maximum efficiency will be also discussed.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY

Dr. Yuri Freeman received MS as engineer-physicist and Ph.D. in Solid State Physics from the renowned school of Thin Solid Films at the Kharkov Polytechnic Institute in Ukraine. He worked as principal scientist in Russian capacitor industry and then at Vishay Sprague in Sanford, Maine. Yuri is now Technical Fellow/VP, Director of Advanced Research and Strategic Development in Tantalum at KEMET Yageo.  He received more than 40 US and International patents and published numerous peer-reviewed papers in tantalum and niobium fields. In 2017 Springer International published the first edition of Yuri’s book Tantalum and Niobium-based capacitors: Science, Technology, and Applications followed in 2022 by the expanded second edition. In 2018 Tantalum and Niobium International Study Center (TIC) awarded Yuri with Ekeberg Prize “for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the knowledge of the metallic elements Tantalum and Niobium”. As adjunct professor Yuri is also teaching Active and Passive Electronic Components at the Clemson University in South Carolina.

 

Phillipe Lessner is vicepresident and CTO of YAGEO group

3.6. Degradation of Aluminum and Tantalum Wet Electrolytic Capacitors during High Temperature Storage

Speaker: Alexander Teverovsky; Jacobs/NASA- GSFC

Aluminum wet electrolytic capacitors (AWEC) are available to higher ranges of capacitance and voltages compared to tantalum wet electrolytic capacitors (TWEC). However, evaporation of the electrolyte during operation or storage of conventional AWEC that is accelerated exponentially with temperature does not allow using these parts in space electronics. Instead, for systems requiring large value capacitors and high operating voltages, designers must use banks of TWECs that increases substantially the size and weight of electronic modules. Development of hermetically sealed AWECs might be beneficial for space systems provided their long-term reliability is assured. Although hermetically sealed TWEC have been used in space systems for years, there is a lack of information about the effects of storage on their characteristics. Increasing leakage currents during storage of AWEC is well known and is often explained by dissolution of aluminum oxide in electrolyte.

However, other possible mechanisms of this effect have not been discussed. In this work, degradation of AC (capacitance, dissipation factor, and equivalent series resistance) and DC characteristics (leakage and absorption currents) in different types of aluminum and tantalum hermetically sealed capacitors in the process of long-term (1000 hour) storage at high (125C and 150C) temperatures was studied. It is shown that leakage currents are degrading in both types of capacitors, but this degradation is reversible after bias application. Mechanisms of degradation are discussed, and explanations based on processes common for both types of capacitors are suggested. Problems associated with assessments of hermeticity and evaporation of the electrolyte in hermetically sealed capacitors are analyzed.

Components:

  •  CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •  QUALITY & RELIABILITY

Alexander Teverovsky 

Alexander Teverovsky received Ph.D in electrical engineering from Moscow University of Electronic Machine Building, Russia.  Dr. Teverovsky jointed Goddard Space Flight Center Parts Analysis lab in 1994 as a senior failure analyst performing failure analysis, design and reliability evaluations of hybrids, microcircuits, and discrete active and passive components.  Starting in 2000, he is working on evaluation of variety of new technologies and devices for space applications.  Dr. Teverovsky is the author of more than 80 papers on failure mechanisms and reliability of electronic components.  Recent research interests include failure mechanisms, reliability modeling, and qualification testing of new technology ceramic and tantalum capacitors.

14:45 Leave for Danfoss Drive Tour

15:00 - 17:00 Danfoss Drive Factory Tour

17:00 Leave for Gala Dinner

18:00 - 23:00 Murata Gala Dinner

23:00 Leave back to Sonderborg
Day 4 Thu 14th Sept.: Sessions, Awards & Closing
8:30 - 9:00 Registration & Welcome Coffee

9:00 - 11:00 Session IV. New Development

Chairman: Frank Puhane, Würth Elektronik

4.1. High Energy Density NanoLamTM Capacitors for Use in Spacecraft Power Processing Units

Speaker: Angelo Yializis Ph.D; Polycharge America Inc

Two of the largest and most critical components in virtually all Power Processing Units of spacecraft, probes, and landers, are energy buffer and DC-link capacitors, used to minimize ripple current, voltage fluctuations, and transient suppression. In addition to conventional high-temperature requirements, missions to planetary bodies that are distant from the sun, as well as lunar regions that are permanently shadowed, require electrical components with low-temperature survivability and predictable and stable functionality at temperatures as low as -240°C.

Current capacitor technologies have severe performance limitations, especially when operated at cryogenic temperatures with exposure to cosmic radiation, as well as radiation internal to the spacecraft. NanoLamTM capacitors, produced using a nanolaminate composite, formed using 1-2Mrad of ionizing Beta radiation, have excellent stability of dielectric properties over a wide temperature range, superior energy density and specific energy, and resistance to degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. In this work, electrical measurements of key dielectric parameters are performed as a function of temperature in the range of -269°C to +145°C.

NanoLamTM capacitors are tested both in the form of individual 3000-layer capacitor elements and as capacitor blocks, comprising multiple capacitor elements with ratings of 750uF/50V and 4.4mF/50V. The effects of highly accelerated voltage stress of 75V to 150V and temperatures as high as 145°C have been analyzed and lifetime to parametric failure is approximated using a Weibull log-linear model.

Components:

  •     CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •     NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Angelo Yializis Ph.D

Angelo Yializis is the founder and CEO of PolyCharge spinoff of Sigma Technologies Int'l of Tucson AZ. In the early-80s, while working at GE, Dr. Yializis developed a series of new capacitor products, including the Polymer Monolithic Capacitor (PMC) technology, which is the only commercial capacitor technology comprising 1000s on nano-thick polymer dielectric layers. The PMC technology was spun out from GE and Sigma Technologies, founded in 1992, completed the technology development and licensed the technology to two multinational capacitor OEMs for use in surface mount consumer electronic capacitor applications. Sigma has also commercialized several pioneering non-capacitor related technologies, including materials for thermal management of commercial and residential structures, ultra-high barrier coatings for packaging films and OLED displays, surface functionalization technologies for treating films and textiles, nanoflake metal pigments for use on inks and paints, color shifting pigments and films for security applications and the development of PMCs for higher voltage DC-link inverter applications. Dr. Yializis received his B.Sc. in Applied Physics, at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, a M.Sc. in Solid State Physics at the University of Windsor and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Windsor. He is the recipient of several technical and managerial awards. He has 50 US patents and more than 50 journal and conference publications.

 

Paul Roop is with Polycharge America Inc

Alexander Teverovsky is with Jacobs/NASA- GSFC

4.2. Shielding metal effect on polypropylene thin-film during focused helium-ion beam irradiation

Speaker: Shova Neupane; Centre for Industrial Electronics (CIE), Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern Denmark

Two of the largest and most critical components in virtually all Power Processing Units of spacecraft, probes, and landers, are energy buffer and DC-link capacitors, used to minimize ripple current, voltage fluctuations, and transient suppression. In addition to conventional high-temperature requirements, missions to planetary bodies that are distant from the sun, as well as lunar regions that are permanently shadowed, require electrical components with low-temperature survivability and predictable and stable functionality at temperatures as low as -240°C.

Current capacitor technologies have severe performance limitations, especially when operated at cryogenic temperatures with exposure to cosmic radiation, as well as radiation internal to the spacecraft. NanoLamTM capacitors, produced using a nanolaminate composite, formed using 1-2Mrad of ionizing Beta radiation, have excellent stability of dielectric properties over a wide temperature range, superior energy density and specific energy, and resistance to degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. In this work, electrical measurements of key dielectric parameters are performed as a function of temperature in the range of -269°C to +145°C.

NanoLamTM capacitors are tested both in the form of individual 3000-layer capacitor elements and as capacitor blocks, comprising multiple capacitor elements with ratings of 750uF/50V and 4.4mF/50V. The effects of highly accelerated voltage stress of 75V to 150V and temperatures as high as 145°C have been analyzed and lifetime to parametric failure is approximated using a Weibull log-linear model.

Components:

  •     CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •     NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Shova Neupane

Shova Neupane Ph.D. is Post.Doc. of Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (DME) at Centre for Industrial Electronics, SDU Sonderborg, Denmark, She has expertise in Corrosion research (initial corrosion initiation study in presence of organic inhibitors at nano-level), Bio-nanointerfaces, Biosensing and state-of-the-art experimental techniques such as AFM (In-situ, ex-situ), electrochemical measurements, SEM, XPS, QCM-D, DLS and UHV surface science characterization tools (AES, LEED)

William Greenbank, Odysseas Gkionis-Konstantatos, Vadzim Adashkevich, Till Leissner, Ayoub Laghrissi, Jacek Fiutowski, Thomas Ebel and Luciana Tavares are with Centre for Industrial Electronics (CIE), Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern Denmark

Serguei Chiriaev is with NanoSYD Centre, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark

4.3. Layer-by-layer printing: how we fabricate the next generation of nanocomposite capacitors for more efficient power electronics

Speaker: William Greenbank; University of Southern Denmark

Electricity generation accounts for 47% of all new carbon emissions because electricity production is expected to increase by 80% by 2040 – a significant portion from fossil fuel sources. It is therefore necessary to both kerb rising demand for energy and increase renewable energy’s share of electricity generation to have any realistic hope of reducing emissions long-term. More efficient power electronics can have an enormous impact on energy wastage. Capacitors are critical to the operation of power electronics, but often the weak link when it comes to efficiency improvements. This is particularly true for electric motors, which account for 40% of all global electricity consumption and this will only increase as electric vehicles become more prevalent. Reducing energy waste in motors requires that their drives are smaller and can tolerate higher temperatures while remaining highly reliable and stable at high voltages. However, existing dielectric materials cannot deliver a capacitor that meets all of these requirements.


Nanocomposite dielectrics are an increasingly important area of innovation in capacitor research as an avenue to improve capacitive energy density, electrical breakdown strength, and temperature stability of devices. In such devices, morphology control is critical in order to optimise electrical field distribution in the device and to prevent the clustering of nanoparticles lowering breakdown voltages. However, this is difficult to achieve with large-scale fabrication techniques, such as melt extrusion and stretching, as melt processing can induce clustering and offers few possibilities for fine structure control of length scales below 1 µm.


Layer-by-layer fabrication offers a potential bottom-up alternative whereby dielectrics are printed by successive depositions of ultra-thin layers of a room-temperature-stable polymer ink. This would allow fine thickness and morphology control and could easily be adapted to industrial-scale printing techniques, like roll-to-roll slot-die coating. Our work explores the potential of this technique by developing two polypropylene-based inks in industry-friendly solvents that are then used to fabricate capacitor devices. A gel ink was able to be used to deposit ultrathin (sub-200 nm) layers of mostly amorphous polypropylene with high reproducibility. Capacitors based on these polypropylene layers perform commensurate with commercial devices, exhibiting excellent self-clearing and breakdown performance. Successive depositions of the ink were also demonstrated, allowing the fabrication of devices with finely tuned thicknesses and capacitances, as well as nanocomposite capacitors. This demonstrates the viability of layer-by-layer dielectric printing and paves the way for commercial ultra-thin conformable polypropylene capacitors, multi-component sandwich nanocomposite capacitors, and multilayer polypropylene capacitors, as well as brand new possibilities in dielectrics research.

Components:

  •     CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • NEW DEVELOPMENT

William Greenbank

William Greenbank is Associated professor at Institut for Mekanik og Elektronik (IME) SDU Center for Industriel Elektronik (CIE) Sonderborg, Denmark. His current research is a part of the high DK materials for next-generation capacitors theme at the SDU Centre for Industrial Electronics. His main tasks are to design, develop, and characterise new materials for use as dielectric materials in high-performance capacitors. William graduated insolar energy/organic electronics, PhD, Interfacial stability and degradation in organic photovoltaic solar cells, by University of Bordeaux in 2016. Received Physical Chemistry, MSc (Hons), Controlling the physical properties of metallomesogens through structural modification, Victoria University of Wellington in 2012.

Shova Neupane, Bartosz Gackowski, Luciana Tavares and Thomas Ebel are with University of Southern Denmark

4.4. Development of a New High-performance Polymer Aluminium Electrolytic Capacitor

Speaker: Shova Neupane; Centre for Industrial Electronics (CIE), Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern Denmark

It has been shown that the use of Aluminium electrolytic capacitors as DC-link capacitors instead of the more traditional metalized film capacitors can lead to ultra-compact integrated inverter designs. However, the high ESR of traditional aluminum electrolytic capacitors leads to increased self-heating and decreased ripple current handling. To overcome this issue, the poorly conducting liquid electrolyte for traditional electrolytic capacitors, can be substituted for better conducting material. For lower voltages PEDOT: PSS-based electrolytes have been successfully developed providing significantly better ESR and current handling. This technology however has so far not reached the operating voltages that the automotive industry desires for DC-link capacitors in power converters in electric cars. Developing this technology to operate reliably at voltages at 450 V will allow polymer aluminum electrolytic capacitors to compete with film capacitors as DC-link in power converters in electrical vehicles [1-4].


In this work, we build up an encapsulated capacitor element by using our standard electrolytic capacitor (e-caps) preparation method [4]. The lifetime behavior (aging test) of the successfully prepared e-caps is under measurement from 08/09/2022 and surviving till date 10/11/2022 with 450V at 105℃. X-ray tomography measurement was done before the aging test in order to know the integrity of the encapsulated e-caps. Leakage current, capacitance, and resistance were measured at regular intervals throughout the lifetime study.

Components:

  •     CAPACITORS

Topics:

   

  • NEW DEVELOPMENT

Shova Neupane

Shova Neupane Ph.D. is Post.Doc. of Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (DME) at Centre for Industrial Electronics, SDU Sonderborg, Denmark, She has expertise in Corrosion research (initial corrosion initiation study in presence of organic inhibitors at nano-level), Bio-nanointerfaces, Biosensing and state-of-the-art experimental techniques such as AFM (In-situ, ex-situ), electrochemical measurements, SEM, XPS, QCM-D, DLS and UHV surface science characterization tools (AES, LEED)

Mihaela Gruia, Steffen Buhrkal-Donau, Luciana Tavares, William Greenbank and Thomas Ebel are with Centre for Industrial Electronics (CIE), Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern Denmark

Coffee Break

11:20 - 13:50 Session V. Applications

Chairman: Christian Merkel, Murata

5.1. How to select gate resistor – from discrete to back-contact-bondable resistors

Speaker: Ove Hach; Vishay BCcomponents Beyschlag GmbH

For years no week has gone by without an updated breaking news about faster and more efficient power semiconductors. Tons of papers are available discussing the power on-off behaviors to address power losses EMI and so on and so forth.

But what about the small gate resistors placed in front of the gates? This resistor controls the performance in parallel connected semiconductor layouts, avoid that transients trigger the switch by forming a low pass filter device, control the gate current spikes and avoid oscillation of the switch. We will address how to select the right gate resistor in terms of technology, size, peak pulse load, rated power, drift, and parasitic behaviors.

Components:

  • RESISTORS

Topics:

  •  APPLICATIONS

Ove Hach

Director of Regional Marketing DBR, Dale and STF, Europe, Vishay Intertechnology, Inc. Dipl.-Ing. (FH).

Ove Hach studied electrical engineering at the University of Applied Sciences in Kiel from 1990 to 1994 after completing an apprenticeship as an electronics technician for power systems. He then developed wire feed systems for LASER welding systems for the automotive and aviation industries at Dinse Schweisstechnik GmbH in Hamburg. From 1998 to 2003 he worked as an application engineer at the resistor manufacturer VISHAY BCcomponents BEYSCHLAG GmbH, advising customers on technical questions about resistors. Between 2004 and 2009 he was responsible as a product manager for the product launch of new products such as SMD chip fuses, SMD platinum temperature and SMD humidity sensors. In 2009 and 2010, as Senior Manager Product Marketing, he assumed responsibility for the entire SMD thin-film lines of the Vishay Draloric/Beyschlag Resistor Division. Between 2011 and 2020 he was entrusted with the coordination of customer projects and due to the experience, he gained, he was given product marketing responsibility for the industrial segment in 2020. From June 2023, his new role is to manage regional marketing in Europe for the Vishay brands Draloric/Beyschlag, Dale and Specialty Thin Film.

5.2. A look at Modern Capacitors used in power conversion

Speaker: Slavomir Pala; KYOCERA AVX Czech Republic

Semiconductor advances have brought about opportunities to power electronics in highly novel and efficient ways. An extreme example is the ability to power Ultra Low Power ICs with a combination of a Tantalum capacitor (wake up power) and a supercapacitor (for processing power). ULP ICs draw such low amounts of power (100nA storage mode, 500nA standby, 1uA – RTC mode) that energy harvesting/scavenging means are adequate to create set and forget circuits with virtually zero maintenance. This is very attractive since maintenance costs and battery waste can be virtually eliminated.

Another circuit which is highly dependent on capacitors performance is that of DC:DC converters. Ceramic capacitors as well as various electrolytic capacitors exhibit excellent performance in this type of circuit with preferences appearing through frequency of use, temperature, power, size and end application limitations. 

This study will look at the two circuits (energy harvesting ULP power sources and DC:DC converters) and outline capacitor performance & trends for each end use.  Use cases will be made for each circuit. Discussions will close with a summary of GaN technology impacts/demands in end applications and how capacitors will be affected.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • APPLICATIONS

Ron Demcko

Ron Demcko graduated in 1982 by Clarkson College of Technology BSEE. Currently an AVX Fellow and manages TSG team at AVX Head Quarters in Fountain Inn SC. This role centers on projects ranging from simulation models for passive components to product support / new product identification & applied development. Prior to that Ron was the EMC lab Manager AVX Raleigh N.C. This lab concentrated on sub assembly testing and passive component fixes for harsh electrical and environmental. Before the EMC lab work, he held an Application Engineering position at AVX Product work included integrated passive components, EMI filters and Transient voltage suppression devices. Before joining AVX he worked as a Product Engineer and later Product Engineering Manager at Corning Glass Works electronics division. In this role he supported production, sale and development of Pulse Resistant Capacitors, High Temperature Capacitors and radiation resistant capacitors. He developed high frequency test methods and co-developed high temperature test systems.

 Slavomir Pala is with KYOCERA AVX Lanskroun, Czech Republic

5.3. Understanding the influence of ESR and Ripple Current for the capacitor selection

Speaker: Alexander Nebel; YAGEO

This application oriented paper explains basics of ESR and ripple current parameters of differences capacitor technologies as a guideline for capacitor selection for your application.

“To find the right capacitor you just need to know Capacitance and Voltage!” is a common misunderstanding by electronic hardware designers. However in order to make functional design with reliable opertation wider background knowledge is needed to be able to choose the best fit capacitor technology. The presentation will include comparison benchmark of key capacitor technologies including modelling and simulation tools. The capacitor guidelines are demonstrated in two practical examples of DC-link capacitors and resonant / snubber capacitor selection.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • APPLICATIONS

Alexander Nebel - Technical Marketing Coordinator and Field Application Engineer for global Automotive Accounts at YAGEO Group, working as Field Application Engineer for more than 10 years at different passive component manufacturers. Starting at KEMET Electronics in 2017 as Field Application Engineer and after the acquisition by YAGEO now responsible for all products of the YAGEO Group. Since beginning of 2022 the Technical Marketing Coordinator in EMEA for technical content.

Jekaterina Stael von Holstein - Field Application Engineer in Central Europe at YAGEO Group, starting at KEMET Electronics in 2020 as Field Application Engineer in Central Europe and after the acquisition by YAGEO now responsible for all products of the YAGEO Group

5.4. Latest Generation of EMI Suppression (Film) Capacitors for xEV Systems

Speaker: David Olalla; TDK Electronics AG

EMI suppression capacitors, as per IEC 60384-14: Fixed capacitors for electromagnetic interference suppression and connection to the supply mains [1] are commonly used to filter undesired EM transients to/from the grid as well as from/to other surrounding systems. The IEC 60384-14 standard is the main reference for the testing and certification of this sub-family of capacitors since the last century. It is a common request in a wide variety of end applications: LED lighting, consumer appliances, solar inverters, power supplies, etc., and nowadays, more and more in some xEV systems connected to the power train (on-board charger, DC-DC converters, filters). But IEC 60384-14 cannot effectively scope all the different particularities of every end application or their respective requirements for these capacitors.

This paper focuses on the particularities for xEV systems that must be addressed (additionally) for EMI suppression capacitors, such as: parameter drift, operation voltage vs. temperature, high-voltage testing, current distribution, parasitic inductance, AEC-Q200[2], mounting and soldering heat, etc., with the latest product range of TDK EMI suppression capacitors providing good design practices and considerations.

Components:

  •     CAPACITORS

Topics:

  •     APPLICATIONS

David Olalla, Vice President Product Development of Film Capacitors Industry & Automotive at TDK Electronics AG, Germany

Telecommunication Engineer in the University of Malaga, Spain (1997), and MBA in ESESA, Spain (2008).  Since 2018, Vice President Product Development of Film Capacitors Industry & Automotive at TDK Electronics AG in Munich. Previously, Product Marketing and Field Application Manager at EPCOS in Malaga Spain (2008-2013), TDK Corporation (2013-2018) in Tokyo, Japan. R&D Product Manager of Film Capacitors at EPCOS in Malaga Spain (1999-2008).  Parts Engineer at Tecnologica in Sevilla, Spain, for the Rosetta program of the European Space Agency.

Felipe Oliveira is with TDK Electronics AG

5.5. Advancement of power electronics through Ceramic Y-Capacitor Technology

Speaker: Moaz El Ghazali; Murata

New developments and increased applications with high power require special EMI suppression capacitors for connection to supply mains. Specifically Y-Capacitors are used for filtering in “line-to-ground” applications where a failure could lead to an electrical shock. Different challenges are given such as requirements through safety standards, electrical performance, reliability as well as component size.

Ceramic capacitor technology can provide solutions for these requirements by reducing the number of components, miniaturization, increase performance by offering different solutions for various challenges in power electronics applications.

Components:

  • CAPACITORS

Topics:

  • APPLICATIONS

Christian Merkel and Moaz El Ghazali are with Murata, Germany

Moaz El Ghazali brief CV:

  • 2022- Now: Product engineer for capacitors at Murata electronics.
  • 2021-2022: Researcher at Helmholtz center HZDR, researched microstructures of transition metal oxides under extreme conditions (high stress, low temperatures, high magnetic fields)
  • 2020: Awarded PhD in physics from Max Planck Institute for Chemical physics of solids. Research focused on electronic and structural properties of transition metal oxides and chalcogenides

14:00 - 14:30 PCNS Best Paper Award & Closing

14:30 Lunch Break with To Go Option

TOPICS

  • MATERIALS & PROCESSES
  • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
  • MEASUREMENT & TEST
  • QUALITY & RELIABILITY
  • TECHNOLOGY & ROADMAPS
  • APPLICATIONS
  • NEW DEVELOPMENT
  • MODELLING & SIMULATION

COMPONENTS

  • CAPACITORS
  • INDUCTORS & TRANSFORMERS
  • RESISTORS
  • FUSES
  • FILTERS
  • RF PASSIVES
  • PASSIVE SENSORS
  • CONNECTORS & CABLES
  • CRYSTALS & OSCILLATORS
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